Vodafone in Egypt: National crises and their implications for multinational corporations (B), Spanish Version Harvard Case Solution & Analysis

On Thursday January 27, 2011, hundreds of tens of thousands of protesters in Egypt were demanding an end to the 30-year rule of President Hosni Mubarak, and to the state of emergency he nurtured during that tenure, and had let prevail. Connectivity and the communicating through social media had acted as a driver that was key in empowering their actions to be coordinated by the protesters. President Mubarak's authorities chose to strike hard at the lifeline of the virtual medium, by using a number of the rights that they had been accorded by the state of emergency. That day, the authorities ordered the three main voice and data communications suppliers in Egypt - Vodafone, Mobinil, and Etisalat - to freeze services in chosen areas. Among these places was Tahrir Square ("Freedom/Martyrs' Square") in Cairo, the greatest nucleus where protesters had gathered. When CEO of Vodafone Egypt, Hatem Dowidar, heard about the order of the government, he was about to take an important choice.

He knew the situation in Egypt was being observed carefully from all over the world. Dowidar also recognized the course of action he picked for would have consequences not merely for Vodafone Egypt, but also for the parent Vodafone Group. He chewed over the potential consequences aware that any choice he took will invariably result in strong responses. The case won 2014 case center case writing award “Hot topic: Crisis chance."

PUBLICATION DATE: February 26, 2014 PRODUCT #: ES1452-HCB-SPA

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Vodafone in Egypt: National crises and their implications for multinational corporations (B), Spanish Version

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