Nuclear Power & the Language of Diplomacy: Negotiating a Game-Changing Nuclear Trade Agreement with India Harvard Case Solution & Analysis

Between April and July 2005, the Indian Foreign Secretary Shyam Saran and US Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs Nicholas Burns encountered a diplomatic challenge: a joint statement of 400-word and structure agreement that-if they were successful-would be the start of a quite complex negotiation between the United States and India to develop a civil nuclear trade pact. The major part of the case defines the background material that evaluates why the negotiation of such a pact took favortisim by the Bush Administration, however it switched 30 years of US foreign policy regarding atomic weapons expansion. It demonstrates the important topics that are necessary to understand the negotiation issues in the joint statement: the kind of relationships between India and US, india’s development in the atomic weapons, and potential challenges in the international nuclear non-proliferation agreements. It defines the needed kind of wordsmithing that is required to Burns and Saran to use, to complete the joint statement. Additionally, it concisely clarifies the five areas that needed to be consider by the two diplomats in order to avoid any difficulty. At the end, it concisely concludes the results of three-year negotiation and describes an 11th hour crisis and strategy to resolve it, depicts the final joint agreement text. Case Number 2023.0

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Nuclear Power & the Language of Diplomacy: Negotiating a Game-Changing Nuclear Trade Agreement with India

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