Moral Person and Moral Manager: How Executives Develop a Reputation for Ethical Leadership Harvard Case Solution & Analysis

Managers do not have to take the reputation of ethical leadership for granted. Based on interviews with managers and employees of corporate ethics, this article shows that the reputation of the executive ethical leadership is based on two main principles: the appearance of executive power as a moral person (based on the perceived characteristics, behavior and decision-making processes) and visibility as a moral manager ( through role modeling, the use of a reward system and communication). Developing reputation ethical leadership pays dividends in reduced legal problems and increase employee commitment, satisfaction, and employee ethics. Alternatives are unethical leader, hypocritical leaders (who says talk but does not walk on foot), and ethically neutral leader (which may be ethical people, but employees do not know, because the leader has made ethics and values ‚Äč‚Äčexplicit part of the leadership of the agenda). The article also offers guidelines for growing reputation for ethical leadership. "Hide
by Linda Klebe Trevino, Laura Pincus Hartman, Michael Brown Source: California Management Review 16 pages. Publication Date: July 1, 2000. Prod. #: CMR183-PDF-ENG

Moral Person and Moral Manager: How Executives Develop a Reputation for Ethical Leadership Case Solution Other Similar Case Solutions like

Moral Person and Moral Manager: How Executives Develop a Reputation for Ethical Leadership

Share This