PATH and the Safe Water Project Empowering the Poor Through User-Centered Design Harvard Case Solution & Analysis

PATH and the Safe Water Project Empowering the Poor Through User-Centered Design Case Solution

This case offers a summary of the not-for-profit company PATH and its Safe Water Project-- a five-year effort introduced in late 2006 with $17 million in financing from the worldwide advancement system of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The function of the grant was to examine to exactly what degree market-based techniques might assist speed up the extensive raising and continual use of family water treatment method and safe storage items by low-income populaces. Through a portfolio of field-based pilots, PATH planned to explore various sales and circulation techniques to enhance customer access to safe water services, for instance water filters and chlorine-based water filtration tablets. It likewise prepared to check various rates and customer funding designs to resolve the price of these items. Nevertheless, comprehensive marketing research exposed another issue-- couple of items in the area were both reliable and developed particularly to satisfy the special requirements and choices of these customers.

Appropriately, PATH got and was granted $7 million in extra grant financing from the Gates Foundation to produce a water filter item that would satisfy high requirements of effectiveness, be preferable-- or aspirational-- to low earnings customers, and work efficiently within the rural situations where most of the poor lived. The PATH group would achieve this by means of a procedure that the company called user-centered design.

Knowing Objective

Expose viewers to the idea of user-centered design. Check out how a user-focused item advancement technique can result in better.

This is just an excerpt. This case is about Business

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PATH and the Safe Water Project Empowering the Poor Through User-Centered Design

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